Currency Counting Solutions

Money Counter Counterfeit Detection - Explained & Defined

Money Counter Counterfeit Detection - Explained & Defined

Counterfeiting money is as old as money itself. It's been around for as long as there has been legitimate currency. From Roman times to modern society. To give you some perspective, during the Civil War era it was estimated that one bill out of three was a counterfeit note. That's crazy. 

On July 5th, 1865, the United States Secret Service was established by President Lincoln. Its only purpose at the time was to combat counterfeited money. It wasn't until 1902, one year after the assassination of President William McKinley, that the Secret Service took on the role of protecting the president.

In 2015, it was estimated that one in every 10,000 US dollars is forged.

Technology advances have been a double-edged sword. It's given us an extensive array of ways to detect counterfeit money, but at the same time technology has made it easier to produce it. Counterfeiting used to be a difficult and expensive endeavor. It required large printing presses and the ability to cut intricate designs by hand into metal plates. Today, you can create fake money with a PC, a scanner and a color inkjet printer. 

One method of counterfeiting is easy to pass low-grade detectors is what's known as bleaching. It involves taking a $5 bill for example and using household chemicals, remove all the ink and markings. Then it is copied over with the image of a $100 bill. The lower grade counterfeit detectors can mistakenly pass it because the paper is authentic.

What most good citizens don't understand is that you can receive counterfeit money innocently enough, but if it's detected when you try to spend it you could be arrested as the believed counterfeiter. If you do find out ahead of time that you have counterfeit money, you're basically stuck with it.

Banks won't replace it even if they were the ones who gave to you! Once you walk outside, it's yours. It's recommended that you contact the Secret Service or your local police.

Okay, now that we know some history and facts, let's find out what the good guys are up to! Today, some counterfeit detectors are individual devices and some are incorporated in machines that count money. The most basic is the Counterfeit Pens. These will only catch the low-grade amateur types of counterfeits. 

While counterfeit pens might seem like an affordable counterfeit detection option, the amount of loss you'll incur will easily offset what you would've saved had you used a reliable counterfeit detector. Human error is also another negative involved.

The next step up is a stand-alone device. You simply insert the bill and it pulls the bill through the device and clearly signals good or bad. A good example is the Cassida Omni-ID. You keep it close to the register and use it as the bills come in giving you instant verification. Many different types, all reasonably priced. They can also be used to validate Driver's Licenses, Passports, Credit Cards, Traveler's Checks, Social Security Cards, and Casino Chips, among many other important documents.

Next, we move up to the money counting machines with counterfeit detection built in. These machines scan each bill as its counted to check for counterfeits. The basic levels of detection are UV, MG, IR, MT, MR, Size & Thickness Detection.

UV

UV stands for Ultraviolet. UV is the most common type of Counterfeit Detection. Bills are made of 75% Cotton and 25% Linen. The US Federal Reserve adds ultraviolet (UV) ink with fluorescent phosphors to bills that cannot be seen in daylight but are clearly visible under UV light at an exact wavelength of 365 nanometers.

If the UV printed images glow when subjected to the UV light, then the banknote is expected to be authentic. UV detectors use a bulb emitting UV light at the correct wavelength and visually verify that it contains UV ink markings.

Such UV security features are valued because the materials used are highly volatile and can get corrupted quickly when inexperienced counterfeiters use commercially available digital printers and inks to create fakes.

MG

MG stands for Magnetic. MG is normally in addition to UV. When the US Federal Reserve prints money, they use ink that contains iron oxide which can be magnetized. Magnetic ink is used as a way to reduce counterfeiting. Every bill has its own magnetic signature that can be read by ATMs, money counters, and even vending machines. The magnetic sensors in Counterfeit Detectors that include magnetic ink detection, search for this magnetic property on the bill. If the magnetic properties in the ink are not detected, the counterfeit detector will flag it as a failed bill that is suspected of being counterfeit. 

IR

IR stands for Infrared. Currencies may be printed with Infrared inks that either reflect or absorb infrared light. These are undetectable to the human eye. They also weave the metallic thread into its bills, in specific sizes and locations. Money counting machines with infrared technology use sensors that detect the presence of both types of Infrared inks, allowing them to identify legitimate currency by nation and denomination.

MT & MR

Metal Thread detector (MT) and Magneto-Resistive sensor (MR). The MT detector is used to check certain metallic components (magnetism) on the passing banknotes. MR stands for Magneto-Resistive equipped with a long MR sensor which is an array of 4 MG heads into one. It scans most part of US bills to check for certain magnetic properties for suspect bill detection.

Size & Thickness

Since 1969 all circulated bills have the exact same dimensions & thickness, 2.61 inches wide by 6.14 inches long, and the thickness is 0.0043 inches. Money counter models that have this functionality can check each bill for length, width & thickness as the machine counts the bills.

CIS

CIS stands for Contact Image Sensor, but it is a feature that does need explanation. It's not as much a form of counterfeit detection, as it is bill recognition. CIS is found in your top of the line model cash counters. It is a small flatbed scanner built into the bill counter. 

The scanner enables the machine to recognize denominations by being able to "see" the bills that are passing by.  It also enables the machine to scan serial numbers if desired.  The CIS technology makes the bill counter much more accurate in regards to recognition of bills and denominations and is preferable over units only equipped with magnetic & infrared sensor recognition. A good example is the Carnation CR1500.

So, what we've learned is that any business or organization that accepts cash is susceptible to counterfeit money. Don't kid yourself, it is a big problem and you need to protect your business. 

Fortunately, we have you covered at CurrencyCountingSoluions.com. We have a wide selection of money counters from the moderate units with counterfeit protection all the way up to the bank-grade high-end models that have all seven levels such as the Safescan 2885-S or the Safescan 2985-SX.

 

 

 


 

How to Select the Right Money Counter for Your Business!

How to Select the Right Money Counter for Your Business!

 

Money counting machines have become an essential tool for most Banks, Credit Unions, Retail, Casinos, and countless other businesses. In today's super competitive business markets you need to streamline your business and become as efficient as possible.

Money Counters provide us with a variety of solutions, all aimed at improving, accuracy, efficiency, and productivity. Keep in mind that it takes a teller on average 15 minutes to count out a drawer and you have to also factor in human error.  

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Now, if you've shopped around at all for a currency counting machine, you have undoubtedly been overwhelmed with the many different brands, models, features and options available. In order to sort all this out, you need to begin by asking yourself some questions to determine what's important and relevant for you:

Do you need counterfeit detection and if so, how much?

Do you need a Money Counter to just count bills or do you need it to add and batch too?

Do you need a Money Counter that can recognize mixed denomination value? 

There are several other questions to answer, so let's take a look at all the different features and help you to better understand all the many factors involved in selecting the right Money Counting machine for you!

 

Counterfeit Detection

Counterfeit Detection is something that all businesses that accept cash should be concerned with. The Treasury Department estimates that $70 million counterfeit bills are in circulation. You could receive counterfeit money directly from a counterfeiter or from someone who unknowingly received the bills from someone else.

If you accept cash, counterfeiting should be an issue of concern for you. Fortunately, even lower end priced currency counters have levels of fraud protection. The minimum basic level of protection is UV.

The main counterfeit detection levels are UV, MG, IR, MT, MR, Size & Thickness Detection. For an in-depth discussion of all these counterfeit detection levels, what they mean and how they work, check out this blog post.

Batch, Add & Value Count

The ADD function allows you to count the number of bills in the hopper and accumulate the total number to the previous count. The Batch function allows you to predetermine how many bills to count before it automatically stops. The Value Count function allows the counting to stop when a specified dollar amount is reached. 

Mixed Value Recognition

AKA - a discriminator. Mixed denomination value detection is arguably one of the most important considerations when thinking about buying a money counter machine. Standard money counters require that you presort your bills and classify them by 1s, 5s, 10s, 20s, etc. However, a mixed bill value counter will automatically detect the denomination of the bill, distinguish it, and add it to the total count accordingly.

For example....if you want to count a mix of 5 x $5, 10 x $10, 20 x $20, the quantity counted will be 35 as the number of bills passed through the machine. The value count will be $525.

Hopper Position & Size

The hopper is where you place the bills in the machine to start counting. There are two basic types of hoppers, back-loading and front-loading. Back-loaders are ideal for smaller volume jobs. As the name suggests, it's located on the back side of the machine. They have restrictions as it holds a smaller amount of bills and you can't add more bills while the machine is counting. The front-loader version gives you more options. The hopper size is bigger allowing you to put a bigger stack of bills in at a time and you can add more bills in while the machine has begun to count. Typically, the hopper size runs from 200 to 1,000 bills, depending on the model.

Counting Speed

The counting speed of money counters is normally calculated as bills per minute. Counting speeds can vary and although faster machines are typically more expensive, they are almost a necessity for any business dealing in large amounts of cash. One of the primary reasons a company needs a money counting machine is to quickly count their cash, saving the company both time and resources by not having an individual do the same task. If you’re in a business that deals with large volumes of cash and short on time, you should look for machines with faster counting speeds.

Count speeds are adjustable and can range from 800 to 1,900 bills per minute. Lower speeds would be for older bills in poor condition, while new crisp bills can be counted at maximum speeds.

 

Multi-Currency

A business that deals with international clients or currency from around the world need to get a bill counting machine that can accurately take into consideration and organize different types of currencies.

Multi-Currency/Mixed denomination value counters can detect the difference between certain types of currencies automatically. But even if your currency counter can’t automatically detect the country of origin for that bill, some bill counters come with a value count feature that allows you to preset the values so you’re able to classify between varying forms of currencies.

Serial Number Recognition

Thanks to its integrated CIS sensor, some machines are able to read the serial number on each bill, depending however on in which orientation the bills are inserted. Serial number recording is useful for tracing and when you need an audit trail. Our Safescan 2885-S and Carnation CR1500 are both equipped to read and record serial numbers. Both have optional printers to print out the results.

Pockets

Currency counting machines can have one or two pockets. With a single pocket, the counting will stop when an unrecognized or suspect bill has been detected and requires you to pull it out before counting can resume. With a two-pocket model when an unrecognized or suspect bill is detected it will automatically move it to the second pocket without stopping the count and the machine keeps counting. 

 

When buying a bill counting machine, it’s best to do your research ahead of time to ensure you are buying the machine that best suits your business needs. The least expensive machine is not always the best and can need replacing long before a mid-range counter, so do your research and ask an expert if you have any questions. At Currency Counting Solutions we are your one stop to selecting the right cash counting machine for you!


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Counterfeit Detection - Your Money is at Risk!

Counterfeit Detection - Your Money is at Risk!

Counterfeiting is one of the oldest crimes in our history. It's been around for as long as there has been legitimate currency. From Roman times to modern society. By the time of the Civil War it's estimated that one in every three bills was a counterfeit note. One in Three! On July 5th, 1865, the United States Secret Service was established by President Lincoln. Its only purpose at the time was to combat counterfeited money. It wasn't until 1902, one year after the assassination of President William McKinley, that the Secret Service took on the role of protecting the president. The world was in need of some sort of Counterfeit Detection.

The US dollar is the second most counterfeited world currency. According to illicittrade.com, in 2015, one in 10,000 US dollars is forged. The $20 bill is the most commonly counterfeited banknote in the U.S., while overseas counterfeiters are more likely to make fake $100 bills. The chances are, you've exchanged fake money at some point in your life. Most likely you haven't realized it, as counterfeits are getting harder and harder to spot. Last year, the Secret Service seized almost $89 million in counterfeit money, and the problem is only getting worse. 

One of the clever techniques used by counterfeiters is to take a $5 bill and bleach the bill using common household chemicals until all the ink has been removed. They then print over it with the markings of a $100 bill. The bills frequently are not caught since the paper is authentic. 

The advances in technology have changed the way counterfeit money is being produced. Just 20 years ago, 99% of counterfeit money was created using sophisticated methods, large-scale printing presses, and forged plates. Today, 60% of counterfeit bills are made using standard inkjet and laser printers that can be bought from any retail store. However, if you don't want to go to all the trouble of making counterfeit money, you can always go on the Web and by it. Yes, you can easily buy high-quality counterfeit money these days.

The sad thing is that if you find out that currency you have is counterfeit, there is nothing you can do with it. Banks will not accept it.....even if they were the ones who gave it to you! You're advised to call your local police or the Secret Service.

Fortunately, the US Federal Reserve is continually coming up with new advancements to combat counterfeiting. But it's no easy task. The new $100 bill has a few new features including a 3D security ribbon to the left of Benjamin Franklin’s portrait visible only on the front of the bill. When you move the bill around you should see the Blue Liberty Bells change to the number 100. Another new element is an enhancement of the color-shifting ink that also is found on the bottom right front corner of $5, $10 and $20 bills.

The good news is that modern cash handling equipment comes with a multitude of new ways to detect counterfeit money, all within a split second of actual time. Some models are specifically designed for nothing but Counterfeit Detection and some provide Counterfeit Detection while counting and sorting the bills. 

The most basic type of Counterfeit Detection used is Ultraviolet or UV. The Federal reserve adds ultraviolet ink with fluorescent phosphors to bills that cannot be seen in daylight but are clearly visible under UV light at an exact wavelength of 365 nanometers. If the UV printed images glow when subjected to the UV light, then the banknote is expected to be authentic. 

The next step up in detection is magnetic or MG. When the US Federal Reserve prints money, they use ink that contains iron oxide which can be magnetized. Magnetic ink is used as a way to reduce counterfeiting. Every bill has its own magnetic signature that can be read by ATM's, money counters, and even vending machines. Have you ever wondered how vending machines know the denomination of the bills entered? This is how. The magnetic sensors in Counterfeit Detectors that include magnetic ink detection, search for this magnetic property on the bill. If the magnetic properties in the ink are not detected, the counterfeit detector will flag it as a failed bill that is suspected of being counterfeit. 

Another detection process is IR, which stands for Infrared. Currencies may be printed with IR inks that either reflect or absorb infrared light. Money counting machines with infrared technology use sensors that detect the presence of both types of IR inks, allowing them to identify legitimate currency by nation and denomination. And weed out the fakes.

There's also Metal Thread detector (MT) and Magneto-resistive sensor (MR). The MT detector is used to check certain metallic components (magnetism) on the passing banknotes. MR stands for Magneto-resistive equipped with a long MR sensor which is an array of 4 MG heads into one. It scans most part of US bills to check for certain magnetic properties for suspect bill detection.

The bottom line is that you need to protect yourself as a business. Holding a bill up to the light doesn't cut it anymore. You need high technology equipment to counter the high technology used to make counterfeit money.

At www.currencycountingsolutions.com, we have a wide variety of money handling equipment with all the counterfeiting detection technology there is to offer today. We have models to fit every budget. Our quality standards are very high and we stand behind everything we offer. Come see us today!